You may purchase giclees or prints directly from the artist
by phone or mail, in the online store, or from the
galleries listed below. Original art is only available from selected galleries.
Call or e-mail for more information. Doug welcomes inquiries
and will discuss commission works.

Doug's work can be found at the following fine galleries:

Edward Dare Gallery
31 Broad St.
Charleston, SC

Friedman's Fine Art
28 West State St.
Savannah, GA 31401

Sandpiper Gallery
2019 Middle St.
Sullivan's Island, SC 29482

With These Hands Gallery
1444 Highway 174
Edisto Island, SC 29438

What are giclee prints?

Giclee pronounced "zhee-clay" is a form of the French word gicler meaning "jet or nozzle."
The name is a whimsical reference to the ink jet printers used in the process.

A giclee is a high resolution digital print made from archival ink and media combination. Giclee
is also a recognized fine art print category like lithographs and seriographs and is ideal for doing
short-run limited editions. Giclee prints were originally developed in 1989 as a plate-less
alternative to common offset lithography. Advances in technology, inks, and media have
allowed them to develop to the point that today they are recognized by the art community as the
best method available for fine art reproduction.

Giclee prints look and feel like original art.  They are made on real artist materials such as
watercolor papers and canvas. Prints have continuous tone so it is often difficult to distinguish
between giclee prints and original artwork.  Canvas giclees can also be "hand retouched" to more
closely resemble the texture of the original artwork, if so desired by the artist. They offer richness
in detail, depth, and brilliant color not available in traditional printing methods. Archival inks,
papers, and canvases used throughout give giclees a life span that far exceeds
that of other reproductions.

Giclee technology is now accepted in hundreds of fine art galleries around the world including the
Metropolitan and Guggenheim Museums in New York City, the Corcoran Museum in Washington, DC
and the High Museum in Atlanta.